50 Types Of Tetras (Complete List)

Types Of Tetras

Tetra fish are some of the most popular kinds of fish to keep in your home aquarium. With a wide variety of colors, shapes, and sizes, the types of tetras can seem nearly endless as you walk through a fish store or browse the available selection of freshwater aquarium fish online.

Tetra fish are a great addition to your fish tank though. Not only do they tend to mix well with other types of aquatic reptiles and fish, but tetras also require low maintenance skills on the part of the aquarist.

From blue to green, black to opalescent, if you want a splash of color and some adorable antics added to your aquarium setup, tetra fish can be the perfect fishy friends!

If you’re interested in finding out more, then read on for a comprehensive collection of 50 of our favorite types of tetras, as well as everything that you need to know before bringing one (or more) home to your aquarium setup!


1. Adonis Tetra

adonis tetra

Typical Fish Size: 1 inch

Care Difficulty Level: Intermediate

Expected Life Span: 2 to 5 years

Minimum Tank Size: 10 gallons or a nano tank

Ideal Water Temperature: 72°F to 79°F

A peaceful fish towards any tankmates it might share space with, the Adonis Tetra is a colorful fish. With its distinctive spotted tail pattern with flecks of red, it has become increasingly popular with fish keepers. They are originally native to Africa, and like to spend their days in a school with at least three other tetras.

2. African Moon Tetra

african moon tetra

Typical Fish Size: Up to 3 inches

Care Difficulty Level: Easy

Expected Life Span: 3 to 5 years

Minimum Tank Size: 20 gallons

Ideal Water Temperature: 73°F to 80°F

A small grey fish that is also native to Africa and the Congo River, the African Moon Tetra is one of the more rare kinds of tetra fish to be kept in a home aquarium. They are tranquil in temperament, and enjoy swimming amid a school of at least six of their own species.

3. Alestes Tetra

alestes tetra

Typical Fish Size: Up to 5 inches

Care Difficulty Level: Beginner

Expected Life Span: 3 to 5 years

Minimum Tank Size: 55 gallons

Ideal Water Temperature: 72°F to 79°F

A larger species of tetra, these robust fish like to actively school with others of their species and need plenty of room to explore the tank. Though they might intimidate smaller fish types, they tend to be peaceful with other tankmates. They are flashy fish with blue, green, and gold colorations.

4. Banded Tetra

Typical Fish Size: Up to 4.5 inches

Care Difficulty Level: Beginner

Expected Life Span: 4 to 8 years

Minimum Tank Size: 40 gallons

Ideal Water Temperature: 73°F to 82°F

Originating from Mexico, the Banded Tetra is a brightly colored fish that can be found in shades of yellow, green, and silver, with fins of yellow and red. These are another large type of tetra fish, and they like to be housed with a moderate-size school of around five others.

5. Bentosi Tetra

Typical Fish Size: 3 inches

Care Difficulty Level: Intermediate

Expected Life Span: 5 years

Minimum Tank Size: 15 gallons or a nano tank

Ideal Water Temperature: 73°F to 82°F

These ornate, flashy fish are found in Brazil and Peru, as well as the aquariums of enthusiastic fish keepers around the world. They are omnivores who can live peacefully with a variety of other tankmates, including a school of other Bentoli Tetras. They are translucent pink with red fins, and they thrive in a tank with slightly acidic water.

6. Black Morpho Tetra

Typical Fish Size: 1.5 to 2 inches

Care Difficulty Level: Intermediate

Expected Life Span: 5 to 6 years

Minimum Tank Size: 30 gallons

Ideal Water Temperature: 76°F to 82°F

With a body that resembles a dart, the Black Morpho Tetra is one of the most interesting looking of its kind. They have large fins with a slender body, and they tend to be feisty in temperament. They should be kept at least in pairs, and do require a slightly more experienced keeper, as males like to spar and are known to chase much smaller fish.

7. Black Neon Tetra

Typical Fish Size: 1.5 inches

Care Difficulty Level: Beginner

Expected Life Span: 3 to 5 years

Minimum Tank Size: 20 gallons

Ideal Water Temperature: 71°F to 80°F

One of the best choices for a beginning fish keeper, the Black Neon Tetra is an attractive fish with streaks of black and silver down their bodies. Very similar to their cousin, the Neon Tetra, these fish are very peaceful and low-maintenance, and best kept in a small-sized school of at least six.

8. Black Phantom Tetra

Typical Fish Size: Up to 2 inches

Care Difficulty Level: Intermediate

Expected Life Span: 3 to 5 years

Minimum Tank Size: 10 gallons or a nano tank

Ideal Water Temperature: 72°F to 80°F

With a body shape that is vaguely tetragonal, these light grey, black, and silver fish are shiny showstoppers. They also tend to jump out of the water, so having a tightly fitted lid on your tank is necessary!

However, Black Phantom Tetras do require a more experienced aquarium keeper, as they tend to be sensitive to water conditions and need particular temperatures, levels of pH, and react badly to any fluctuations.

9. Black Skirt Tetra

Typical Fish Size: 3 inches

Care Difficulty Level: Beginner

Expected Life Span: 3 to 5 years

Minimum Tank Size: 15 to 20 gallons

Ideal Water Temperature: 75°F to 80°F

Also known as the Black Widow Tetra, these fish are native to South America and make a gorgeous addition to your aquarium. Black Skirt Tetra fish are very hardy and easy to care for, with long, flowing fins that give it the appearance of wearing a mourning dress.

Like other types of tetra fish, they do not thrive well on their own, requiring a group of at least five other individuals to school with.

10. Blackedge Tetra

Typical Fish Size: 1.7 inches

Care Difficulty Level: Intermediate

Expected Life Span: 3 to 5 years

Minimum Tank Size: 30 gallons

Ideal Water Temperature: 73°F to 82°F

A very small species, the Blackedge Tetra has a streamlined body that allows it to swim very fast in its native waters of the Amazon Basin. In your aquarium, however, this fish is content to school with a large number of others in a decently sized tank.

They are a popular addition to aquariums due to their coloring combination of light blue and black, as they zip around the enclosure and explore among the plants and objects.

11. Bleeding Heart Tetra

Typical Fish Size: 2 to 3 inches

Care Difficulty Level: Beginner

Expected Life Span: 3 to 5 years

Minimum Tank Size: 20 gallons

Ideal Water Temperature: 72°F to 80°F

One of the most distinctive types of tetra, these fish are known for the red dot on the center of their body that gives the appearance of a bleeding heart, along with bright red coloration along its spine.

The Bleeding Heart Tetra is a favorite among fish keepers not only for its unique appearance, but also for its tranquil nature that allows it to get along with any other kind of fish in the tank.

12. Bloodfin Tetra

Typical Fish Size: 2 inches

Care Difficulty Level: Beginner

Expected Life Span: 6 to 9 years

Minimum Tank Size: 30 gallons

Ideal Water Temperature: 70°F to 80°F

A fish that needs to be kept in pairs or groups, the Bloodfin Tetra is small but vibrant in color. They tolerate a wide range of conditions and adjust to minor changes, but do require an omnivore-style diet that includes live worms, brine shrimp, and frozen plankton.

Bloodfin Tetras have also been known to jump out of the tank during their frequent antics, so keeping a tight lid on the top is a must. Keep them in a school of at least eight other individuals.

13. Blue Tetra

Typical Fish Size: 2 inches

Care Difficulty Level: Beginner

Expected Life Span: Around 3 years

Minimum Tank Size: 10 to 20 gallons

Ideal Water Temperature: 72°F to 78°F

An eye-catching fish with a mixture of bright silver and deep blue along its body and tail, the Blue Tetra is a lovely addition to your aquarium. They are small in size, but this also makes them perfect to house as a school in a small planted tank. However, make sure not to overcrowd the tank, as they can become nippy when they feel closed in.

14. Bucktooth Tetra

Typical Fish Size: 5 inches

Care Difficulty Level: Intermediate

Expected Life Span: 10 years

Minimum Tank Size: 55 gallons

Ideal Water Temperature: 73°F to 82°F

One of the largest and longest-lived types of tetras, the Bucktooth tetra is not compatible with communal tank living though, and needs to be kept in a species-specific enclosure. They are predatory fish that will consume other smaller species, their scales, and their fins.

However, given the proper setup, they are quite interesting to watch in their daily lives, as Bucktooth Tetras are an active, adventurous type of fish.

15. Buenos Aires Tetra

Typical Fish Size: 1.5 inches

Care Difficulty Level: Intermediate

Expected Life Span: 3 o 6 years

Minimum Tank Size: 15 gallons

Ideal Water Temperature: °F to °F

These fish have iridescent bodies that glitter in the right lighting and originate from Argentina and Brazil. The Buenos Aires Tetra is best fed an omnivore diet several times a day, which will help bring out the rainbow coloring of their scales, and should include live food, fresh vegetables, and fish flakes.

16. Candy Cane Tetra

Typical Fish Size: 3 inches

Care Difficulty Level: Beginner

Expected Life Span: 2 to 5 years or longer

Minimum Tank Size: 20 gallons

Ideal Water Temperature: 73°F to 82°F

A peaceful and communal fish, the Candy Cane Tetra will keep you mesmerized with its candy-colored body and graceful swimming. These fish require a group of around six to really see their personalities and active nature revealed.

17. Cardinal Tetra

Typical Fish Size: Up to 2 inches

Care Difficulty Level: Beginner

Expected Life Span: 2 to 5 years

Minimum Tank Size: 10 to 20 gallons

Ideal Water Temperature: 73°F to 80°F

One of the easiest types of tetras to care for, the Cardinal Tetra is a bit larger than its cousin, the Neon Tetra, and attracts plenty of stares for the gorgeous and bright coloring. They require a medium-sized school with stable water conditions, but can live easily in a communal tank.

18. Carlana Tetra

Typical Fish Size: 2.5 inches

Care Difficulty Level: Advanced

Expected Life Span: At least 8 to 10 years

Minimum Tank Size: 10 to 20 gallons

Ideal Water Temperature: 73°F to 82°F

This fish is actually one of the rarer types of tetra fish that aquarists can raise, with a narrow yellow body and distinctive dorsal fin. Due to their specific environmental needs, the Carlana Tetra requires a very experienced fish keeper to keep them healthy.

19. Cochus Blue Tetra

Typical Fish Size: 1.6 inches

Care Difficulty Level: Beginner

Expected Life Span: 3 to 4 years

Minimum Tank Size: 20 to 30 gallons

Ideal Water Temperature: 73°F to 82°F

Though not as widely available as other types of tetras, the Cochus Blue Tetra is a feisty little fish that thrives in heavily planted tank environments along with a school of others. They are swift and shiny, making for a daily display of antics in a communal tank.

20. Coffee Bean Tetra

Typical Fish Size: 1.6 inches

Care Difficulty Level: Beginner

Expected Life Span: 3 to 5 years

Minimum Tank Size: 15 gallons or a nano tank

Ideal Water Temperature: 75°F to 82°F

A gentle and sensitive fish, the Coffee Bean Tetra is small and highly sought-after by fish keepers for its adorable eyes and graceful silver body with black markings. They thrive best when kept in a large group of around ten individuals inside a dimly lit, well-planted aquarium.

21. Columbian Tetra

Typical Fish Size: 2.5 inches

Care Difficulty Level: Beginner

Expected Life Span: 3 to 5 years

Minimum Tank Size: 10 gallons or a nano tank

Ideal Water Temperature: 75°F to 81°F

One of the nippier types, the Columbian Tetra is best suited for group life in a species-specific tank. They are medium-sized fish, and can be known for bullying smaller fish when left in a communal aquarium, however, they are not aggressive within their own groups.

22. Congo Tetra

Typical Fish Size: 3 to 3.5 inches

Care Difficulty Level: Beginner

Expected Life Span: 3 to 5 years

Minimum Tank Size: 30 gallons

Ideal Water Temperature: 75°F to 81°F

A stunning fish with pink, blue, and purple coloring on the body and flowing fins, the Congo Tetra is prized for adding an opalescent hue to an aquarium. These fish do require a diet partially consisting of animal feed and plant feed to maintain their health.

23. Dawn Tetra

Typical Fish Size: 1.3 inches

Care Difficulty Level: Beginner

Expected Life Span: 3 to 5 years

Minimum Tank Size: 15 to 20 gallons

Ideal Water Temperature: 66°F to 75°F

With distinctive black and white spots around their tail area, these small tetra fish are an adorable addition to your tank. The Dawn Tetra is known for being reticent in nature, and can mix well with other fish in a communal setting.

24. Diamond Tetra

Typical Fish Size: 1.5 inches

Care Difficulty Level: Beginner

Expected Life Span: 3 to 6 years

Minimum Tank Size: 20 gallons

Ideal Water Temperature: 75°F to 82°F

Reminiscent of its name, the Diamond Tetra looks like a shining, translucent gem as it swims through the water. They are peaceful and easy to manage for people of all levels of fish-keeping experience, and aquarists find them a real joy that makes their tank shine bright like a diamond.

25. Discus Tetra

Typical Fish Size: 4 to 6.5 inches

Care Difficulty Level: Intermediate

Expected Life Span: 3 to 5 years

Minimum Tank Size: 50 gallons

Ideal Water Temperature: 75°F to 80°F

A large tetra fish that is surprisingly peaceful for its size, the Discus Tetra is still a very active fish and requires a large tank. They are hardy and low-maintenance, so long as they are fed an omnivore diet.

However, because they tend to have an appetite for greenery in your tank, it’s recommended that you do not place them in a planted space.

26. Disk Tetra

Typical Fish Size: Up to 16 inches

Care Difficulty Level: Very Advanced

Expected Life Span: 8 to 10 years, or longer

Minimum Tank Size: 200 gallons or more

Ideal Water Temperature: 72°F to 78°F

Not to be confused with the Discus Tetra, the Disk Tetra is much larger and will live longer. These fish are known for a strong bite and willful attitude, so a very experienced keeper is necessary to properly care for Disk Tetras. They also like to live in schools of other Disk Tetras, so given their adult size, an incredibly large tank area is needed.

27. Ember Tetra

Typical Fish Size: 1 inch

Care Difficulty Level: Beginner

Expected Life Span: 10 years

Minimum Tank Size: 10 gallons or a nano tank

Ideal Water Temperature: 75°F to 82°F

Because of their long life spans and incredibly easy nature, Ember Tetras are a perfect beginner fish. They have a lovely orange hue that makes them stand out when schooling with others in your aquarium, as they can also live with a variety of other fish types.

28. Emperor Tetra

Typical Fish Size: 2 inches

Care Difficulty Level: Beginner

Expected Life Span: Up to 6 years

Minimum Tank Size: 10 gallons or a nano tank

Ideal Water Temperature: 73.5°F to 80.5°F

These lovely little fish have a purple glow that adds a beautiful dimension to your aquarium. One of their most striking features is the color of their eyes—males typically have metallic blue eyes, whereas females sport metallic-green ones.

29. Filigree Bloodfin Tetra

Typical Fish Size: 1.5 inches

Care Difficulty Level: Intermediate

Expected Life Span: About 5 years

Minimum Tank Size: 30 gallons

Ideal Water Temperature: 72°F to 80°F

With a transparent body that is long and slender, these fish also sport a signature blood-red fin that gives it its name. They are slow, casual fish that will thrive in a species-only environment placed within a larger tank to give them plenty of room to roam around.

30. Flag Tetra

Typical Fish Size: 1.5 inches

Care Difficulty Level: Beginner

Expected Life Span: Up to 8 years

Minimum Tank Size: 15 gallons

Ideal Water Temperature: 68°F to 79°F

This can be a difficult type of tetra to locate for an at-home aquarium, but if you can source Flag Tetras, they are a delightful addition to your tank. They should be kept in large schools, and like to have plenty of plant life to hide within, as well as a sandy substrate.

31. Flame Tetra

Typical Fish Size: 2 inches

Care Difficulty Level: Intermediate

Expected Life Span: Up to 5 years

Minimum Tank Size: 10 to 20 gallons

Ideal Water Temperature: 72°F to 82°F

A sought-after specimen, these fiery little fish will light up your tank with a mix of red and orange that is true to their name. Flame Tetras are tranquil and friendly, making them ideal for schooling in a community tank. They also enjoy plenty of plants and sand substrate that replicate their natural Brazilian environment.

32. GloFish Tetra

Typical Fish Size: 1 inch

Care Difficulty Level: Beginner

Expected Life Span: Up to 4 years

Minimum Tank Size: 30 gallons

Ideal Water Temperature: 72°F to 78°F

Essentially a normal type of tetra, these fish have been specifically and genetically engineered to appear in a variety of vibrant and glowing colors. These include purple, pink, orange, green, red, and blue, making GloFishTetra schools perfect for adding a pop of color to your tank.

33. Glowlight Tetra

Typical Fish Size: 1.5 inches

Care Difficulty Level: Beginner

Expected Life Span: 2 to 4 years

Minimum Tank Size: 15 gallons

Ideal Water Temperature: 72°F to 80°F

With coloring that is reminiscent of a faintly glowing lightbulb filament, visible through their translucent skin, these fish should be kept in a large group of the same species—at least ten of one kind. Glowlight Tetras will not school with other types of fish and will become unhappy if alone.

34. Gold Tetra

Typical Fish Size: Up to 1 inch

Care Difficulty Level: Beginner

Expected Life Span: 2 to 3 years, perhaps longer

Minimum Tank Size: 20 gallons

Ideal Water Temperature: 73°F to 80°F

These small, attractive fish are a spectacular addition to your tank, and get along very well with a variety of other species. Gold Tetras like to live in a group of others and enjoy having plant life to hide in. They also need a flake diet that is supplemented with brine shrimp or daphnia.

35. Golden Pristella Tetra

Typical Fish Size: 1.75 inches

Care Difficulty Level: Beginner

Expected Life Span: 4 to 5 years

Minimum Tank Size: 15 to 20 gallons

Ideal Water Temperature: 80°F to 84°F

A gentle and peaceful fish, unfortunately, the Golden Pristella Tetra is not commonly found in most fish stores. However, if you can find a school of these fish for your aquarium, they blend into a community tank wonderfully, providing hours of enjoyment.

36. Green Neon Tetra

Typical Fish Size: 1.5 inches

Care Difficulty Level: Beginner

Expected Life Span: 2 to 3 years

Minimum Tank Size: 10 to 20 gallons

Ideal Water Temperature: 73°F to 82°F

These incredibly colorful and bright schooling fish are a delight to have in your aquarium. With a mix of green shades and vibrant blues, the Green Neon Tetra is a gorgeous little fish with a big but peaceful personality.

37. Head And Tail Light Tetra

Typical Fish Size: 2 inches

Care Difficulty Level: Beginner

Expected Life Span: 5 years

Minimum Tank Size: 15 gallons

Ideal Water Temperature: 72°F to 80°F

Though the Head and Tail Light Tetra can be a shy fish, it enjoys schooling with others of its kind, and can exist peacefully in a community tank. Because of their reticent nature, make sure the tank has plenty of plants and shelters for these fish to hide in.

38. Lemon Tetra

Typical Fish Size: 1.5 inches

Care Difficulty Level: Beginner

Expected Life Span: Up to 8 years

Minimum Tank Size: 20 gallons

Ideal Water Temperature: 72°F to 79°F

A gorgeously colored type of tetra, the Lemon tetra boasts a white body with distinctive yellow hues. The intensity of its coloring typically varies depending on the fish’s gender, but it’s a lovely addition to your communal tank regardless.

39. Longfin Tetra

Typical Fish Size: 1.5 inches

Care Difficulty Level: Beginner

Expected Life Span: 5 to 8 years

Minimum Tank Size: 10 gallons or a nano tank

Ideal Water Temperature: 72°F to 79°F

True to its name, the Longfin Tetra sports large dorsal and tail fins that tend to be pure white, in contrast to the light blush color of its body. These fish can be fin nippers when paired with smaller species in a communal tank though, so be cautious.

40. Mexican Tetra

Typical Fish Size: Up to 4.5 inches

Care Difficulty Level: Advanced

Expected Life Span: 3 to 5 years

Minimum Tank Size: 20 to 30 gallons

Ideal Water Temperature: 61°F to 72°F

These fish are also known as Blind Cave Tetras, or Cave Tetras, due to the location of their initial discovery in Mexico.

This also gives rise to their unusual appearance—the Mexican Tetra has no eyes and an albino body from adapting to dark, enclosed conditions. They’re also aggressive and require a more experienced keeper for best results.

41. Neon Tetra

Typical Fish Size: 1.5 inches

Care Difficulty Level: Beginner

Expected Life Span: 2 to 3 years

Minimum Tank Size: 10 to 20 gallons

Ideal Water Temperature: °F to °F

Arguably one of the most popular types of tetra for any level of fish keeper, the Neon Tetra is a lovely little fish with active antics and low maintenance needs. Populating your tank with a school of these will provide you with plenty of enjoyment.

42. Niger Tetra

Typical Fish Size: 4 inches

Care Difficulty Level: Intermediate

Expected Life Span: 5 to 8 years

Minimum Tank Size: 30 to 50 gallons

Ideal Water Temperature: 75°F to 82°F

With a dull blue body and bright, flashing eyes that range between red and orange, the Niger Tetra is an odd-looking but striking fish. Its preferred tank conditions include a slight current, with places for them to rest against it.

43. Panda Tetra

Typical Fish Size: 1.5 inches

Care Difficulty Level: Intermediate

Expected Life Span: 2 to 5 years

Minimum Tank Size: 10 gallons

Ideal Water Temperature: °F to °F

Panda Tetras sport a distinctive black and white coloration at the base of their tails that give them their name, as it is reminiscent of a panda’s face. They need to be kept in a large school though, or else they will get lonely and nippy.

44. Penguin Tetra

Typical Fish Size: 3 inches

Care Difficulty Level: Beginner

Expected Life Span: 3 to 5 years

Minimum Tank Size: 30 gallons

Ideal Water Temperature: 72°F to 82°F

With light grey bodies and a streak of dark coloration down their center, the Penguin Tetra is a distinctive fish. They like to swim in medium-sized schools, and can mingle in communal aquariums so long as no larger fish are present to eat them.

45. Rainbow Tetra

Typical Fish Size: 1.5 inches

Care Difficulty Level: Beginner

Expected Life Span: 3 to 5 years

Minimum Tank Size: 20 to 30 gallons

Ideal Water Temperature: 72°F to 80°F

With an iridescent sheen that makes it thrilling to watch them swim through the aquarium, the Rainbow Tetra is a perennial favorite among aquarists. Rainbow Tetras change color as the light hits them, and remain a good size for smaller community tanks.

46. Redeye Tetra

Typical Fish Size: 2.5 inches

Care Difficulty Level: Beginner

Expected Life Span: 5 years

Minimum Tank Size: 20 gallons

Ideal Water Temperature: 75°F to 82°F

This type of tetra is highly adaptable to living in various tank conditions, and is great for a beginning fish keeper who is still learning the ropes. Originally from South America, the Redeye Tetra has a distinctive crimson hue to the top of their eyes that provides their name.

47. Ruby Tetra

Typical Fish Size: 0.8 inches

Care Difficulty Level: Beginner

Expected Life Span: 5 to 10 years

Minimum Tank Size: 10 gallons or a nano tank

Ideal Water Temperature: °F to °F

A lovely little fish that is bright red in hue, adding a large school of Ruby Tetras to your tank is a sure way to draw visitors’ attention. However, you must ensure that you keep to a strict tank maintenance routine, as these fish can be delicate and are averse to dirty water.

48. Rummy Nose Tetra

Typical Fish Size: 2 inches

Care Difficulty Level: Beginner

Expected Life Span: 3 to 5 years

Minimum Tank Size: 20 gallons

Ideal Water Temperature: 72°F to 80°F

Sporting a shiny white body with a red head and eye regions, the Rummy Nose Tetra has a unique appearance that appeals to many fish keepers. They are very peaceful fish that can live in harmony with other species in a tank.

49. Serpae Tetra

Typical Fish Size: 1.75 inches

Care Difficulty Level: Intermediate

Expected Life Span: Up to 7 years

Minimum Tank Size: 10 gallons or a nano tank

Ideal Water Temperature: 72°F to 79°F

The Serpae Tetra is a very active little fish that is naturally shy and prefers plenty of tank plants to hide within. Their coloration is quite striking, with rusty-red bodies, black scale accents, and black-edged fins, brought out even more by a high-quality diet.

50. X-Ray Tetra

X-Ray Tetra

Typical Fish Size: 2 inches

Care Difficulty Level: Beginner

Expected Life Span: 5 years or longer

Minimum Tank Size: 10 gallons or a nano tank

Ideal Water Temperature: 75°F to 82°F

With translucent bodies and massive black eyes, the X-Ray Tetra is not a fish that you’ll soon forget. They are highly adaptable, which makes them perfect for beginners, and their tranquil nature allows X-Ray Tetras to live in harmony with other species.


FAQ

Now that we have been introduced to the wide variety that exists in types of tetras, it’s time to address any further questions that aspiring fish keepers or curious aquarists might have. Read on for the answers to many common questions about tetras.

What Is The Most Beautiful Tetra?

Though which type of tetra is the most beautiful is ultimately up to personal preference, two of the top species are undoubtedly the Black Skirt Tetra, with their flowing fins and lacy-looking edges, and the Neon Tetra, with their vibrant coloring.

Aquarium suppliers and fish stores routinely sell these types of tetra to aquarists for their looks and low-maintenance needs.

How Many Tetras Should Be Kept Together?

At least six tetras should be kept in a school together within the same tank. This does depend on the specific kind of tetra and their temperament, but keeping between six to eight tetras together will lead to happier, healthier fish.

Like most other fish, tetras should never be kept alone. Even if you want to keep tetras in pairs, it is likely to lead to bad health and shorter life spans. Tetra fish are a schooling species, so keeping them in a group is essential.

What Are The Most Aggressive Tetras?

Tetras are not known as overtly aggressive fish. However, some types of tetras are more assertive or nippier than others, largely depending on their size and the size of other fish in the tank. This includes Bucktooth Tetras, Serpae Tetras, and Panda Tetras.

These three types of tetras tend to show slight aggression towards smaller denizens of the fish tank, although not against their own kind. Such behaviors include fin nipping and chasing others around the aquarium. However, if you keep them in large enough groups with space to roam, their dominant personalities should not pose a massive issue.

What Are The Easiest Tetra To Keep?

If you are a beginning fish keeper, tetra fish tend to be some of the easiest fish to have in your aquarium. Not only are they low-maintenance fish, but they also tend to get along well with other tankmates without issue. But some types are easier to keep than others, including:

  • Bleeding Heart Tetras.
  • Cardinal Tetras.
  • Ember Tetras.
  • Rummy Nose Tetras.
  • Serpae Tetras.

Do Tetras Need A Bubbler?

The short answer is no, tetras do not need a bubbler or any other type of oxygen-producing device. However, adding a bubbler to your tank will help agitate and aerate the tank, which makes it a better living environment for all your fish.

Because tetras are relatively small, tolerant fish, they do not require a consistent flow of extra oxygen in their water. Instead, you can fill the tank with a variety of aquatic plants that not only help produce oxygen in the aquarium, but also give your inquisitive tetras plenty of places to explore and environments to hide in.

Do Tetras Need Salt?

Because tetras are a type of freshwater fish species, they do not need salt in their water to survive. In fact, tetras will not live long in a tank that has purely saltwater in it.

If you want to add salt to your tank for other fish inside, or to help with keeping it clean, tetras can withstand a small amount of salt that is added slowly. This ratio works out to be less than one tablespoon of salt per every two gallons of water. Too much salt will adversely affect the digestive tracts of your tetras and cause them harm.


Final Thoughts

Whether you are a beginning fish keeper or an experienced aquarist, tetra fish are a great option for filling up your tank setup.

These fish tend to be low-maintenance and easily added to a community aquarium—with some exceptions—and will provide hours of enjoyment with their eye-catching looks and unique personalities.

If you are looking for the next addition to your fish tank and want to choose from a wide variety of colors, shapes, and sizes, look no further than the many types of tetras that are available, and give your aquarium a pop of color and some fishy antics!